The Vaccines

Please note: the following information is intended for guidance only. Please ask your own medical advisor for copies of vaccine product information that are relevant to you.


The UK childhood vaccination schedule (as at 1/11/12)

Pregnant women are offered screening for hepatitis B. If they have acute hepatitis B or are found to be carriers, their babies are offered hepatitis B vaccines starting at birth, given in three doses, and hepatitis B immunoglobulin if recommended.

At birth, targeted children will be offered BCG vaccine (one injection) against TB (tuberculosis). The vaccination is usually offered while the baby is still in hospital, but it can be given at any time.

2 months: five-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) plus pneumococcal

One single injection covers diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), hib meningitis and polio, plus a second injection for pneumococcal infection. Six components given by two injections during the same appointment. 

3 months: five-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) second dose, plus meningitis C 

Six components given by two injections during the same appointment. 

4 months: five-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) third dose, plus pneumococcal second dose, plus meningitis C second dose 

Seven components given by three injections during the same appointment. 

Between 12 and 13 months: Hib/Men C (Hib fourth dose, Men C third dose), plus MMR, plus pneumococcal third dose

Hib meningitis and meningitis C is given as a single combined injection. 

MMR covers measles, mumps and rubella first dose and is given as a single combined injection. 

Pneumococcal infection makes up the third dose. 

Six components given by three injections during the same appointment.

3 years and four months: MMR second dose plus four-in-1 (DtaP/IPV) given as a single combined booster vaccine for diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) and polio. 

Seven components given by two injections during the same appointment.

Between 12 - 13 years: HPV vaccine which covers human papillomavirus given as a single injection in three doses within a six month period. Currently given to girls only.

13 to 18 years: three-in-1 Td/IPV booster dose for diphtheria, tetanus and polio 

Three components given by one injection.

Other vaccines will be offered to children considered to be in risk groups. As well as hepatitis B and BCG vaccines already mentioned, vaccines for chickenpox and flu/swine flu will be routinely offered through the NHS system.


Vaccine schedules around the world

To find out which vaccines are used in any country and when they are given, check out: World Health Organization Vaccine Preventable Diseases Monitoring System:

Immunization schedules by antigen, selection centre:

http://www.who.int/immunization_monitoring/en/globalsummary/scheduleselect.cfm





 





















jackie@jabs.org.uk © John Fletcher 2012